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This is the schedule for REA2015. Don’t forget to visit our REA2015 website for all the other details! In particular, please make sure you register for meeting. Once you have registered and received your Sched credentials, please log in here and add the sessions you plan to attend to your personal schedule so that we can assign rooms appropriately.

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Thursday, November 5
 

10:00am

Pre-Conference Session 1: Enhancing and Augmenting Your Practice with Strategies & Tools
Session One of Pre-Conference: Using Technology to Spark the Imagination in Classroom and Online Teaching/Learning.

With the overwhelming number of tools available online today, it's easy to get lost. In this session, you'll learn how to choose and use essential synchronous/asynchronous tools effectively to create content, design effective presentations, communicate virtually and more!

Visit Kristen's website for resources related to this session.

Note: this pre-conference is free. Just be sure to add it to your personal schedule so we know how many attendees to plan for.

Speakers
avatar for Kristen Treglia

Kristen Treglia

Senior Instructional Technologist, Fordham Road Collaborative
Kristen Treglia is a Senior Instructional Technologist at Fordham University. Here, she develops a wide range of technology resources for faculty and teaches them best practices in using technology-based teaching methods and materials. She is also a Blackboard Administrator and is... Read More →

Helpers
avatar for Mary Rothschild

Mary Rothschild

Director, Non-profit, Healthy Media Choices
Mary Rothschild teaches a course in Media and Children at Adelphi University and in the Communication and Media Studies Department of Fordham University while heading Healthy Media Choices, a non-profit that provides strategies for parents and teachers around intentional use of media... Read More →

Thursday November 5, 2015 10:00am - 12:30pm
Brookhaven (Hotel Terrace Level)

1:30pm

Pre-Conference Session 2: Everything You Didn't Know You Needed to Know About the Social Web
Session Two of Pre-Conference: Using Technology to Spark the Imagination in Classroom and Online Teaching/Learning.

The social web is more than just Facebook and Instagram. In this session, learn how to select and use different channels of the social web to improve your practice through professional development. By growing your own Personal Learning Network (PLN) you'll inspire students and model online habits to empower them to take ownership of their use of the social web and foster life-long learners of the 21st Century.

Visit Kristen's website for resources related to this session.

Note: this pre-conference is free. Just be sure to add it to your personal schedule so we know how many attendees to plan for.

Speakers
avatar for Kristen Treglia

Kristen Treglia

Senior Instructional Technologist, Fordham Road Collaborative
Kristen Treglia is a Senior Instructional Technologist at Fordham University. Here, she develops a wide range of technology resources for faculty and teaches them best practices in using technology-based teaching methods and materials. She is also a Blackboard Administrator and is... Read More →

Helpers
avatar for Mary Rothschild

Mary Rothschild

Director, Non-profit, Healthy Media Choices
Mary Rothschild teaches a course in Media and Children at Adelphi University and in the Communication and Media Studies Department of Fordham University while heading Healthy Media Choices, a non-profit that provides strategies for parents and teachers around intentional use of media... Read More →

Thursday November 5, 2015 1:30pm - 4:00pm
Brookhaven (Hotel Terrace Level)

4:00pm

Learn to use Sched
Discover how to get the most out of our electronic schedule! Bring your phone, tablet, or laptop to see how it works on your own device.

Helpers
avatar for Eric Celeste

Eric Celeste

Consultant, Tenseg
I have been working with REA on its website and other technology since 2010. My son, Alex, and I run a technology consulting company, Tenseg LLC, together.

Thursday November 5, 2015 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Brookhaven (Hotel Terrace Level)

7:00pm

REA:APPRRE Board Meeting
Helpers
avatar for Lucinda Huffaker

Lucinda Huffaker

Yale Divinity School

Thursday November 5, 2015 7:00pm - 10:00pm
Brookhaven (Hotel Terrace Level)
 
Friday, November 6
 

8:00am

REA:APPRRE Board Meeting
Continues the Board Meeting that started on Thursday evening.

Helpers
avatar for Lucinda Huffaker

Lucinda Huffaker

Yale Divinity School

Friday November 6, 2015 8:00am - 11:15am
Chastain B (Hotel Terrace Level)

8:00am

Registration
Helpers
avatar for Lucinda Huffaker

Lucinda Huffaker

Yale Divinity School

Friday November 6, 2015 8:00am - 3:30pm
Foyer (Conference Center)

8:00am

Exhibits and Bookstore
Helpers
avatar for Lucinda Huffaker

Lucinda Huffaker

Yale Divinity School

Friday November 6, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
Foyer (Conference Center)

11:30am

1:00pm

1:30pm

Plenary 1: Reflecting on Teaching and Imagination
Emilie Townes will present. Thomas Groome and Deborah Court will respond. Padraic O’Hare will moderate.

Moderators & Responders
avatar for Deborah Court

Deborah Court

Associate Professor, Bar-Ilan University
Deborah Court is a retired associate professor in the School of Education at Bar-Ilan University in Israel. Her research centers on school culture, religious education, interfaith and intercultural education, the nature of teachers' knowledge, and qualitative research methodologies... Read More →
TG

Thomas Groome

Director, Boston College
PO

Padraic O'hare

Professor, Merrimack College

Speakers
ET

Emilie Townes

Vanderbilt University


Friday November 6, 2015 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Buckhead B (Conference Center)

3:30pm

C 1.07
Christian Spirituality Education Re-Imagined: Piloting a Highlander-Inspired Course
Beth Anderson (Graduate Theological Union)

Colloquium
[Notes] I am in the process of piloting a Christian spirituality course based on the transformative educational methodology developed by Myles Horton and the Highlander Research and Education Center. I will explore whether a Highlander-inspired pedagogy offers an effective model for engaging diversity, practicing intercultural dialogue, fostering social change, and integrating theory and practice in the context of teaching Christian spirituality at the seminary level. The principles of teacher research and the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) will guide my analysis of the pilot course.


What’s Your Story? Storytelling and Interreligious Dialogue in Religious Education

Cynthia Stewart (Garrett Evangelical Theological Seminary)

Colloquium. [Notes] College campuses are filled with students who have a story. Religious educators can create a classroom setting where students' voices can be heard and they can share their story. But how can students learn to hear the story of “the other"? To have inter-religious dialogue can be a transformative and liberating process. It can be a practice of freedom where one can think critically and creatively to imagine and discover a new reality as one participates in transforming their world. Storytelling is the means by which transformation and liberation can happen in the classroom setting.


Please note: Tamar Wasoian has withdrawn her presentation "Storied Imagination" from this Colloquium.

Speakers
avatar for Beth Anderson

Beth Anderson

Doctoral Candidate, Graduate Theological Union
I'm an avid runner/swimmer/paddler. When I'm not studying spirituality or working in the admissions office, you'll most likely find me outdoors! Doctoral Candidate : Admissions Assistant : 2015-16 Newhall Fellow Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley, CA
avatar for Cynthia Stewart,PhD

Cynthia Stewart,PhD

Adjunct Faculty, North Park University and Evangelical Theological Seminary
I am a newly minted PhD from Garrett Evangelical Theological Seminary (Evanston, IL) where I completed my dissertation: Making it Out of "Da Hood": A Phenomenological Perspective of Resiliency and Spirituality Among African American Adolescents and Young Adults. It is a qualitative... Read More →


Friday November 6, 2015 3:30pm - 4:45pm
Chastain A (Hotel Terrace Level)

3:30pm

C 1.08
Imagination and Religious-Moral Education: Janusz Korczak's Parable "How God Took to His Feet and Fled the Temple"
Marc Silverman (Hebrew University, School of Education)

Colloquium. [Notes] There is widespread consensus among all those familiar with Janusz Korczak's educational work and writings that he is among the world-class humanists and moral educators of the twentieth century. His humanism, educational theory and practices are clearly grounded in profound religious sensibilities. In this paper I lend a close reading to the parable he wrote entitled, "How God Took to His Feet and Fled the Temple," and propose that this text demonstrates how imagination can expose persons to religious insights, and inspire them to reflect upon and possibly adopt them.


The Blank Page: Students as Readers and Leaders of Biblical Interpretation
Amy Lindeman Allen (Vanderbilt University)

Colloquium. [Notes] In contrast to Lockean epistemology that suggests humans are born as a blank page on which the task of the educator is to write, this paper follows Christian educator Sofia Cavalletti in arguing that the blank page is in our future and not in our past. All students begin with their unique experience, enthusiasm, and imagination. The task of the Christian Educator is not to replace this with predetermined content, but to harness these qualities through open and genuine engagement with the biblical text. Such engagement takes seriously the personhood and context of each student and frees them to become both readers of the Bible and leaders of their own interpretation, filling the blank page(s) of their future.



Speakers
avatar for Amy Allen

Amy Allen

Fellow in Theology and Practice, Vanderbilt University
avatar for Marc Robert Silverman

Marc Robert Silverman

Senior Lecturer (retired), Hebrew University, Dept. of Education
Born in 1946, in Bronx, NYC (0- 4 yrs old); bred in Dallas, Texas (6-17.5 yrs old), learning and teaching in Jerusalem over the past 45 years (since 1969). Am married for forty-three years to Orna. She is a Sabra – native-born Israeli. Presently retired , she was a master teacher... Read More →


Friday November 6, 2015 3:30pm - 4:45pm
Augusta (Conference Center)

3:30pm

RC 1.06
Restoring God’s Reign in Religious Imaginations: A Pedagogical Approach for Promoting Integration in Learners’ Minds, Hearts, and Lives
Patrick Manning (Boston College)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] The importance of attending to the imagination in religious education is paramount. Our cognitional needs demand it, Jesus models it, and our image-flooded culture makes it a practical necessity. But what does it look like to teach the Christian faith in a way that does not merely pay lip service but actually promotes genuine transformation of learners’ imaginations? Synthesizing research on Jesus’ teaching, cognitive science, and educational best practices, this paper presents a proposal for an innovative pedagogical process that meets the aforementioned exigencies.


Power in the Process: Embracing the Ugly in Teaching for Freedom
Lakisha Lockhart (Boston College)

Colloquium. [Notes] The dynamic of wanting equality and freedom in the classroom, while not being able to attain it, is an ugly truth that educators face. bell hooks calls educators to use education as a practice of freedom. Educating for freedom is a difficult task for the educator in light of the various structures of hierarchy, control and dominance that permeate institutions and classrooms and prevent freedom and equality. Looking at the work of bell hooks, Maria Harris and Maxine Greene, this dialogue will imagine what educating for freedom might actually look like in theological education.


Speakers
avatar for Lakisha Lockhart

Lakisha Lockhart

Student, Boston College
Lakisha Lockhart is a gregarious and playful scholar activist. She is currently a doctoral student at Boston College in Theology and Education researching play as a cultural signification for women of color, which can provide a space for agency and authenticity for these women in... Read More →
avatar for Patrick Manning

Patrick Manning

Assistant Professor of Pastoral Theology, Seton Hall University
As a religious educator, professor, and teacher formator, my goal is to facilitate transformative encounters with the Christian tradition in the classroom setting. Operating at the intersection of theology, education, and cognitive science, my work focuses on methods of theological/religious... Read More →


Friday November 6, 2015 3:30pm - 4:45pm
Ponce de Leon (Hotel Terrace Level)

3:30pm

R 1.01
Making the Familiar Strange: The Sociological Imagination and Religious Education
Melissa James (First Unitarian Universalist Church of San Diego)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] In the mid-20th century the concept of sociological imagination, coined by C. Wright Mills, created a significant and lasting shift within sociological engagement with the world. To employ the sociological imagination one must “make the familiar strange” whereby everyday experiences are seen as parts of larger social structures. This paper examines the use of sociological imagination as a framework to engage in religious education for social change and asks whether or not a more robust employment of the sociological imagination is warranted within children’s religious education.


From Location and (Non-)Place to Space: An Exploration of the Role of Imagination as the Key to Creating Spaces Learners Feel Attached to
Cok Bakker (Utrecht University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Our focus is on ways to decorate a place to address learners’ imaginative power, a precondition to satisfy their (presupposed) spiritual longings for a better world. Video-taped statements of pupils age 10-11 of three intercultural and interreligious primary schools illustrate the power of architecture. We invited them to write down their stories about safe and unpleasant places in the school. We are inspired by authors articulating the emotional effect of the environment on people’s well-being (Jonker, 2014).


Note: Ina ter Avest will not be able to present with Cok Bakker.


Speakers
CB

Cok Bakker

Professor, Utrecht University
MJ

Melissa James

Professor; Director of programs including religious education, First Unitarian Universalist Church of San Diego


Friday November 6, 2015 3:30pm - 4:45pm
Brookhaven (Hotel Terrace Level)

3:30pm

R 1.02
Eggs, Clocks, and Other Things Liquid: Salvador Dali's Claim to Truth as Practical Theology
Alan Smith (Florida Southern College, retired)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Salvador Dali’s artwork represented an imaginative and creative dialogue with twentieth-century Roman Catholic theology that consistently challenged the late-modern and emerging postmodern world to new ways of conceiving of art, of reality, and of truth. The presentation will propose a “practical theology of the arts” through its exploration of Dali’s engagement with a fusion of art, theology, and science.


Ignatian Contemplation in the Classroom: Fostering the Imagination in Scripture Study
Francis Alvarez (Boston College)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] The practice of Ignatian contemplation (IC), a method of praying suggested in the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius, can ignite the imagination in Scripture study. By involving the body and emotions, IC helps one be immersed in a Bible scene. More than just a technique that can lead to an imaginative wrestling with texts, IC seeks to facilitate an encounter with God. But to integrate IC in teaching the Bible, one needs a more dynamic understanding of what Scripture is, an appreciation of ritual, and an expanded view of Scripture study that goes beyond discursive historical-critical methods.



Speakers
FA

Francis Alvarez

student, Boston College School of Theology and Ministry
AS

Alan Smith

Retired Professor, Florida Southern College


Friday November 6, 2015 3:30pm - 4:45pm
Dahlonega (Conference Center)

3:30pm

R 1.03
Children and Imagination: Envisioning and Creating Change Together
Tanya Eustace (Discipleship Ministries)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Imagination is a divine gift. This paper presents data collected from a qualitative research study with children that reveals imagination as a tool children use to engage, recognize, claim, and respond to God’s presence in their lives. Suggestions are made for a pedagogy that encourages the use of imagination in order to develop creative and critical thinking, self-discovery, and awareness of others. This opens a space for compassion and understanding, inviting children to engage in the world around them with empathy and creativity as they seek to be voices that connect, disrupt, and transform.


Children, Prayer, Religious Imagination and Ontological Wholeness
Mary Ellen Durante (Fordham University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] This paper considers how children are imaginative and full of wonder and how these qualities are foundational in developing their religious imaginations when teaching children how to pray. Imagining the possibilities life holds can help them construct and reconstruct a sense of the meaningfulness of their lives and the world they live in. The author looks at how parents and religious educators can invite children to engage their imaginations and form a religious imagination leading them to becoming more ontologically whole.



Speakers
avatar for Mary Ellen Durante

Mary Ellen Durante

Director of Catechesis, Roman Catholic Diocese of Rochester, NY
Mary Ellen Durante, Ph.D. is an alumni of the Fordham University Graduate School of Religion and Religious Education. With an extensive background in curriculum development, music, and the arts Mary Ellen excels in integrating faith with creative educational programs that focus on... Read More →
avatar for Tanya Eustace

Tanya Eustace

Director, Children and Intergenerational Ministries, General Board of Discipleship
Rev. Dr.  Tanya Marie Eustace is an ordained deacon in the United Methodist Church through the Rio Texas Conference. She serves as Director, Children and Intergenerational Ministries at Discipleship Ministries (formerly known as the General Board of Discipleship). Tanya completed... Read More →


Friday November 6, 2015 3:30pm - 4:45pm
Chastain B (Hotel Terrace Level)

3:30pm

R 1.04
Transformative Learning in Ecclesial Borderlands: Imagining Pedagogical Possibilites
Susan Reynolds (Boston College)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] This paper draws on a theological understanding of borderlands as elaborated by U.S. Latino/a scholars to advance a notion of “borderland parishes” as imaginative spaces of intercultural contact, contestation, and transformation. Borderlands challenge Jack Mezirow’s understanding of dialogue in transformative learning by taking seriously power asymmetries. I argue that shared participation in ritual provides a more fruitful precondition to dialogue than Mezirow's idealized preconditions as it possesses a greater potential than dialogue alone for the cultivation of cross-cultural relationships.


Liturgy as Prophetic Imagination: A Form of Church Curriculum
Donna Eschenauer (St. Joseph's Seminary and College)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Liturgy, the ritual prayer of the community, is a centuries old way of giving thanks and praise; however, it is ultimately a way of engaging in symbolic acts of hope. Researched from a Roman Catholic point of view and drawing its educational insights from the work of Maria Harris and Gabriel Moran, this paper explores the practice of liturgy “as a component of the curriculum of educational ministry" (Harris 1989, 94-95) and, in turn, explores the profound elements of the prophetic imagination that are present in and through liturgy.



Speakers
avatar for Donna Eschenauer

Donna Eschenauer

Associate Academic Dean, St. Joseph's Seminary and College
Dr. Eschenauer received her Ph.D. from the Graduate School of Religion and Religious Education, Fordham University. She has been the Associate Dean at St. Joseph’s Seminary and College for the Archdiocese of New York since her appointment in August 2012, which is open for graduate... Read More →
SR

Susan Reynolds

PhD Student, Boston College


Friday November 6, 2015 3:30pm - 4:45pm
Suwannee (Conference Center)

3:30pm

R 1.05
Shaping Practical, Scriptural Imagination in Communities of Faith
Amanda Pittman (Duke University Divinity School)

Research Interest Group. [Paper]  In Acts 10, Peter experiences an imaginative conversion with regard to the inclusion of the Gentiles. I suggest that educators interested in the imagination's role in Christian formation can glean profitable insights from Luke’s account of this event. The first section compares theories that primarily situate imagination at either the conscious or preconscious level, ultimately suggesting that the theories are complementary. After analyzing the biblical text through this pedagogical lens, I move toward suggestions for reading biblical narratives for imaginative formation.


Playing for Love’s Sake: Imagining and Embodying God’s New Creation Through Clowning
Courtney Goto (Boston University School of Theology)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Christian religious educators are charged with teaching the practice of loving as Jesus did--enacting radical, life-giving ways of being with one another. In contrast to traditional approaches, the author presents playing as a liberative pedagogy to help adult learners imagine and embody God’s new creation. The session explores a video of seminary students experimenting with playing by clowning. In mimicking “fools for Christ,” they surprise themselves by loving. The video is analyzed through interdisciplinary perspectives, drawing on D.W. Winnicott, Jürgen Moltmann, Maria Harris, and others.



Speakers
avatar for Courtney Goto

Courtney Goto

Assistant Professor of Religious Education, Boston University School of Theology
Courtney Goto is Assistant Professor of Religious Education at the Boston University School of Theology. Her first book, The Grace of Playing will be the third volume published in the REA Horizons series. Her current book project addresses cultural imperialism in practical theological... Read More →
avatar for Amanda Pittman

Amanda Pittman

Graduate Student (ThD), Duke University Divinity School
Christian formation, pedagogy, imagination, congregational contexts, narratives and practices, Christian Scriptures, undergraduate and seminary theological education


Friday November 6, 2015 3:30pm - 4:45pm
Savannah (Conference Center)

3:30pm

W 1.09
Imagination, Revelation and Transformation: That’s What Happens When Art Participates in Religious Education
Francisca Ireland-Verwoerd (Boston University)

Workshop. [Notes] When art is a participant – instead of a tool – in religious education, new ways of thinking and knowing can occur. The pedagogy of this approach is one of hospitality in several movements: “Come on in,” “Bon appetite,” “After dinner conversation,” and “Next time at your place.” Entertaining art as a valued guest, we will learn from art, from each other and about ourselves as we engage in the conversation together. By connecting meaning in art and meaning making through art to our own experiences (imagination), unique insights (revelation) can lead to change and growth (transformation).



Speakers
avatar for Francisca Ireland-Verwoerd

Francisca Ireland-Verwoerd

PhD student, Boston University
Born and raised in the Netherlands, I have lived in 5 countries and now reside near Boston, MA, with my husband and son. My areas of interest are practical theology, missiology, aesthetics/art, and religious/theological education. An ordained elder in the Church of the Nazarene, I... Read More →


Friday November 6, 2015 3:30pm - 4:45pm
Marietta (Conference Center)

5:15pm

Plenary 2: The Power of Imagination Within and Beyond Communities of Faith
Fred Edie will present "Imagining the Untapped Depths in Liturgy and Ritual" and Nick Stuart will present "People of Faith Imaginatively Engaging the World to Nurture Compassion, Justice, and Hope." Kathy Winings will moderate.

Moderators & Responders
avatar for Kathy Winings

Kathy Winings

Unification Theological Seminary

Speakers
FE

Fred Edie

Teacher, Duke Divinity School
NS

Nick Stuart

Odyssey Networks


Friday November 6, 2015 5:15pm - 6:45pm
Buckhead B (Conference Center)

7:15pm

REA Annual Banquet
Video Tribute to Marie Harris and Teaching and Religious Imagination.

Please be sure you have purchased the conference meal plan so that you get a ticket to attend the banquet. Add this meal to your schedule so we know how many plan to attend. 

Friday November 6, 2015 7:15pm - 9:15pm
Heritage B (Conference Center)
 
Saturday, November 7
 

7:30am

Graduate Student Breakfast: Imagining a Vocation as a Religious Educator
Any students attending are welcome to this free breakfast. Please make sure to add it to your schedule so we know how many are attending.

Moderators & Responders
BS

Barbara Senecal Davis

Minister, Fordham University

Speakers
GR

Graham Rossiter

Professor of Moral and Religious Education, Australian Catholic University
NS

Nick Stuart

Odyssey Networks


Saturday November 7, 2015 7:30am - 8:45am
Heritage A (Conference Center)

8:00am

All About REA
If you're new to REA or you simply want to know more about your organization, its roots and vision, this session is for you!  REA Board members will provide important information and seek to answer all your questions!

Saturday November 7, 2015 8:00am - 8:45am
Suwannee (Conference Center)

8:00am

Registration
Helpers
avatar for Lucinda Huffaker

Lucinda Huffaker

Yale Divinity School

Saturday November 7, 2015 8:00am - 3:30pm
Foyer (Conference Center)

8:00am

Exhibits and Bookstore
Helpers
avatar for Lucinda Huffaker

Lucinda Huffaker

Yale Divinity School

Saturday November 7, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
Foyer (Conference Center)

9:00am

Plenary 3: Media and Imagination
Graham Rossiter will present Decoding the Contemporary Religious Imagination: A Critical Appraisal of Media Orchestrated Imaginations and the Rise of "Consumerist" Religion. Marisa Crawford and Katherine Turpin will respond. Leah Gunning Francis will moderate. [Handout]

Moderators & Responders
MC

Marisa Crawford

Teacher, Our Lady of the Sacred Heart College, Sydney
LG

Leah Gunning Francis

Professor, Eden Theological Seminary
avatar for Katherine Turpin

Katherine Turpin

Associate Professor of Religious Education, Iliff School of Theology

Speakers
GR

Graham Rossiter

Professor of Moral and Religious Education, Australian Catholic University


Saturday November 7, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
Buckhead B (Conference Center)

11:00am

C 2.08
Less Balking, More Talking: Good Sex Education in the Roman Catholic Church as Imagined by Young Adult Women
Emily Kahm (Iliff School of Theology and University of Denver)

Colloquium. [Notes] This in-progress qualitative study on religious sexuality formation in young adult women who were raised Catholic asked participants to imagine their ideal sexuality education experience, both by re-imagining their own upbringing and by explaining how they would teach their own children about sex and sexuality. Participants emphasized the need for sexuality education to be heavily conversational, to respect the knowledge and experiences of the learner regardless of their age, and to emphasize the dignity of the learner foremost. Further themes may arise with continued research.


Lived Religion of Coaches: A Phenomenological Study
Matt Hoven (St. Joseph's College, University of Alberta)

Colloquium. [Notes] Research in religious education has a poor track record in the area of sport. Too often the work is only practice-based and can even disgrace the societal significance of sport. In response, this study examines the lived religion of coaches in competitive youth sports. Through a phenomenological approach, the study presents how coaches describe their religious experiences, beliefs and practices in their everyday coaching. Insight drawn from this qualitative research leads religious educators to consider implications within the field of sport.



Speakers
avatar for Matt Hoven

Matt Hoven

Assistant Professor, St Joseph's College at the University of Alberta
I'm a professor at a catholic college that is part of a major research university in Edmonton, Canada. I completed my doctoral work at Catholic University of America in Washington, DC, and now teach courses in RE and sport and religion to undergraduates and educational leadership... Read More →
avatar for Emily Kahm

Emily Kahm

Iliff School of Theology and University of Denver
I am a practical theologian finishing a Ph.D. in Religious Studies at Iliff School of Theology and the University of Denver. I specialize in religious sexuality education, adult faith formation, and gender studies.


Saturday November 7, 2015 11:00am - 12:15pm
Brookhaven (Hotel Terrace Level)

11:00am

C 2.09
The Challenges of Teaching the Religion Component of the Ethics and Religious Culture Program: A Study of Secondary Teachers in the Montreal Area
Sabrina Jafralie, McGill University

Colloquy. [Notes] So far very few studies have focused on the implementation of the program.  One study surveyed elementary school teachers' perception of the program.  This study highlights two major problems: 1) although elementary teachers support the goals of the ERC program, they continue to have problems with teaching the religion competency. Moreover, the research to date has not focused on the specific challenges faced by secondary school teacher.
     This presentation explores the challenges that the religion competency presents to secondary school ERC teachers. In addition, this presentation will share the preliminary findings of the interviews with the secondary school teachers.

Speakers
avatar for Sabrina Jafralie

Sabrina Jafralie

Lecturer, McGill University


Saturday November 7, 2015 11:00am - 12:15pm
Savannah (Conference Center)

11:00am

C 2.07
A Conceptual Analysis of Imagination in the Context of Faith
Deborah Court (Bar-Ilan University, Israel)

Colloquium. [Notes] What is imagination? What is its role and what are its boundaries in the context of both faith, which requires a suspension of the need for proof, and religious knowledge and practice, which is structured by a set of texts, rules and rituals? What can we learn from the intersections of imagination, faith and religious structures? This colloquy will present a beginning conceptual analysis of imagination and attempt to locate its meaning and possibilities in relation to religious faith, religious knowledge and practice and religious education.


Religious Attitude and Commitment of 1.5 and 2nd Generation Asian-Canadian Protestant Young Adults

Nam Soon Song (Knox College, University of Toronto)

Colloquium. [Notes] This paper presents research entitled, "Religious Attitudes and Commitment of 1.5 and 2nd Generation Asian-Canadian Protestant Young Adults." It surveyed 300 Asian Canadian University students, ages 18 to 25, who identify as Protestant to better understand their religious attitudes and commitment to their churches. The findings so far have been eye opening. Of the 300 students, 216 participants currently attend church. In their written responses, the students used the words “being connected,” “diversity,” “openness,” and “inclusiveness” to describe what they wanted in their church lives.


Speakers
avatar for Deborah Court

Deborah Court

Associate Professor, Bar-Ilan University
Deborah Court is a retired associate professor in the School of Education at Bar-Ilan University in Israel. Her research centers on school culture, religious education, interfaith and intercultural education, the nature of teachers' knowledge, and qualitative research methodologies... Read More →
NS

Nam-Soon Song

Professor, Knox College


Saturday November 7, 2015 11:00am - 12:15pm
Suwannee (Conference Center)

11:00am

RC 2.02
Connecting, Disrupting, and Transforming Stories through Imaginative Weaving: Asian and Asian American Women’s Power of Imagining in Their Postcolonial and Diasporic Reading of the Bible
Sung Hee Chang (Union Presbyterian Seminary)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] This paper examines Walter Brueggemann’s understanding of biblical imagination, provides examples of Kwok Pui-lan’s imaginative story-weaving, and intends to model how Asian and Asian American women connect, disrupt, and transform stories, both biblical and other, in their postcolonial context and diasporic social location. It is this paper’s contention that Kwok’s use of “critical incidents” and her “parallel processing” reading strategy will offer a theoretical as well as practical roadmap for the development of narrative religious education.


Identity and Faith in the In-Between: The Power of Imagination in Adolescent and Emerging Adult Development
Melissa Brandes (Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary)

Colloquium. [Notes] Adolescents and emerging adults traverse many in-between diasporic spaces as they attempt to develop identity, faith, and meaning in their lives. This paper will explore what light Kwok Pui-lan’s notion of diasporic imagination sheds on both young peoples’ work of identity/faith formation and religious educators’ work of supporting that formation. Imagination in the in-between has the power to open up new directions by reframing stories and allowing stories that don’t fit to remain, even in tension. These more authentic life narratives offer wholeness and freedom in identity/faith development.



Speakers
MB

Melissa Brandes

Ph.D. Candidate, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary
SH

Sung Hee Chang

faculty, Union Presbyterian Seminary


Saturday November 7, 2015 11:00am - 12:15pm
Dahlonega (Conference Center)

11:00am

R 2.01
Imagining the Unheard: Performing Stories, Fostering Empathy
Alfred Pang (Boston College)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] This paper explores the relationship between imagination and empathy, with a focus on the experience of performers at “Voicing the Unheard,” an event held early this year at Boston College to have students and faculty reflect on the connection between narrative, identity, and ministry. Drawing on Judith Jordan’s concept of "relational being" and in conjunction with narrative theory and pedagogy, I consider how we might begin to articulate the dynamics of what it means to carry someone else’s story in performance, and its impact on the ways we imagine our personal identities.


Finding Our Way: Young Adults, Imagination, and Communal Discernment
Dori Baker (Forum for Theological Exploration)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] This paper examines the role of imagination within Quaker clearness committees through the lens of young adults discerning how their gifts, identities, and vocations play a role in the creation of a more hopeful and just future. By engaging the literature of the imagination alongside religious education scholarship, we provide a framework for current research with young adults discerning the future emerging through their own lives. Following Ricoeur’s “productive imagination” and the Ignatian “gospel imagination,” we argue that central to communal discernment is the exercise of imagination.



Speakers
avatar for Dori Baker

Dori Baker

Research Fellow, FTE
avatar for Callid Keefe-Perry

Callid Keefe-Perry

Executive Director at ARC | Doctoral Candidate at BU, ARC: Arts | Religion | Culture & Boston University School of Theology
Callid Keefe-Perry is a father and husband. He is a member of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) and travels in the itinerant Ministry, serving within and beyond that denomination. He is an organizational consultant, retreat leader, and teacher of discernment influenced by... Read More →
avatar for Alfred Pang

Alfred Pang

PhD Student, Boston College School of Theology and Ministry
I'm a doctoral student in Theology and Education at the School of Theology and Ministry, Boston College. My research interests include: the relationship between teaching and healing in religious education, youth ministry, and theologies of children and childhood.


Saturday November 7, 2015 11:00am - 12:15pm
Chastain A (Hotel Terrace Level)

11:00am

R 2.03
Building Bridges of Hope: The Church's Role in Reaching Disconnected Black Youth
Anne Wimberly (Interdenomination Theological Center, Emerita, Dir., Youth Program) 
Sarah Farmer (Emory University)


Research Interest Group. [Paper] The research paper presents final outcomes of a national study on Black teens' disconnection from organized religion, profiles of these youth, meanings assigned to the term "disconnected youth," often called "unchurched youth," and ministry paradigms that successfully build bridges of connection between these youth and churches. Study findings reveal Black teens' views of shortcomings of faith communities; their needs, hopes, and specific recommendations for churches; and the importance of giving youth voice that challenges churches to reverse their inattention to them.


The Imagination of the Prophets: Reading the Word and the World with Adolescent Girls
Cynthia Cameron (Boston College)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] At its best, religious education is an education for faith that is liberating and just. This is also the task that the biblical prophets took up – calling the people of Israel to participation in God’s justice. They engaged in an educational project of consciousness-raising – of forming the imaginations of the people. For adolescent girls, as a particularly marginalized community within the church, the prophetic call for justice can engage their imaginations. By putting the biblical world of the prophets into conversation with the sexism and ageism of their experiences, girls can cultivate their own prophetic imagination and, ultimately, their prophetic voice.



Speakers
CC

Cynthia Cameron

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, Rivier University
avatar for Sarah Farmer

Sarah Farmer

Student, Emory University
I received my B.A from Berea College (cum laude) in 2001 and my M.Div from Candler School of Theology in 2008. I am currently working on a dissertation entitled, “Hope in Confinement: Moving Toward a Pedagogy of Restorative Hope.” My research examines the concept of hope as it... Read More →
AW

Anne Wimberly

Prof. Emerita, Director Youth Theology Program, Interdenominational Theological Center


Saturday November 7, 2015 11:00am - 12:15pm
Augusta (Conference Center)

11:00am

R 2.04
A Way Forward: Nurturing the Imagination at the Intersection Race, Class, Gender, and Age
Annie Lockhart-Gilroy (Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Those who are oppressed often find themselves internalizing voices that limit their ability. This paper focuses on a population that falls on the non-hegemonic side of intersections of race, class, gender, and age: Black girls from poor and working class backgrounds. Internalizing these limiting voices can lead to a sense of personal hopelessness. This paper gives a brief overview of the problem of personal hopelessness. To combat this, it then presents a Christian education paradigm based on nurturing the theological imagination.


What's So Offensive About a #womanwholikesherself?
Jennifer Moe (Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Comedian Amy Schumer, in response to a twitter challenge to “offend everyone in four words,” produced the hashtag #womanwholikesherself. I will propose several questions for discussion around the topic of self-love, self-like, and religious identity for women: What comes to mind when someone says a woman “likes herself”? Is there a difference between loving yourself (as in “love your neighbor as yourself”) and liking yourself? What is so offensive about the idea that a woman likes herself? And finally, can we imagine a religious education that encourages girls and women to like themselves?

Speakers
AL

Annie Lockhart-Gilroy

Director of Youth Ministry, Faith United Methodist Church
JM

Jennifer Moe

Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary


Saturday November 7, 2015 11:00am - 12:15pm
Chastain B (Hotel Terrace Level)

11:00am

R 2.05
Imagining a Different Path: Religious Education and the Pilgrimage of Motherhood
Patricia Lipperini (Fordham University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Motherhood is a complex experience that can be transformative, offering women opportunities for personal enrichment and spiritual development. However, when women travel the path of motherhood, they find themselves at the confluence of many powerful streams of imagination. Besides imagined days of caring for the child, they may be influenced and burdened by the assumptions of western culture and Christian tradition, which often ignore the complexity of their experiences. A richly re-imagined religious education can fashion a context that can support and enliven women in their motherhood.


Coat of Many Colors: Dolly Parton, Julia Kristeva, and Rural Discipleship
Jonathan LeMaster-Smith (Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Dolly Parton's song "Coat of Many Colors” paints the picture of a mother who sews a coat for her daughter while telling the story of Joseph’s many colored coat, bringing the daughter great joy. Steeped in the rural values of stewardship, knowledge of place, and making do, Parton's song pairs well with Julia Kristeva’s understanding of Christianity’s potential to refine suffering into joy through addressing the suffering present in life. This fusion becomes the pattern for a rural Christian practice of blending scripture and craft to respond to the struggles of rural working-class life.



Speakers
avatar for Jonathan LeMaster-Smith

Jonathan LeMaster-Smith

Affiliate, Sioux Falls Seminary
PL

Patricia Lipperini

Director of Parish Faith Formation, Blessed Teresa of Calcutta Parish


Saturday November 7, 2015 11:00am - 12:15pm
Ponce de Leon (Hotel Terrace Level)

11:00am

R 2.06
Imagining a Way to Repair and Reshape the Unresolved Battle Over Revelation in American Protestantism
Barbara Senecal-Davis (Fordham University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] The unresolved battle over revelation in American Protestantism crystalizes in the debate between Harrison Elliott and James Smart in the 1940‘s and 1950‘s. This paper engages the arguments of Elliott's Can Religious Education Be Christian? and Smart’s The Teaching Ministry of the Church concerning their views on scripture and revelation. Their ideas are brought into conversation primarily with Gabriel Moran, who imagines an alternative understanding of revelation. This understanding creates opportunities for reshaping this conflict through the creative tensions and connectivity of teaching-learning.


For All the Saints: The Cult of Saints and Theological Imagination in the Art of Liberal Protestant Youth Ministry
Jason Okrzynski (First Congregational Church of Wilmette)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] In the construction of selfhood, emerging adults draw on external voices to develop their internal voice and extend their lives into the world. In order then to educate for redemptive selves, young people require concrete and reliable resources that can prophetically stir theological imagination in the development of redemptive selves. In this paper I propose the lives of the saints as a resource for drawing out theological imagination in Liberal Protestant youth ministry.



Speakers
BS

Barbara Senecal Davis

Minister, Fordham University
avatar for Jason Okrzynski

Jason Okrzynski

Professor/Clergy, First Congregational Church of Wilmette


Saturday November 7, 2015 11:00am - 12:15pm
Oglethorpe (Conference Center)

11:00am

W 2.10
Imagining Digital Catechesis: How It Clicked in One Parish
Lope Lesigues (Fordham University)

Workshop. [Notes] This workshop on Digital Catechesis will present the Catholic imagination in action. It will outline the pedagogical crisis caused by the declining population of elementary-level students in religious education from 1970 to 2014, and show how to reverse the current downward trend. A pictorial (and when possible, actual) tour of the FFF website will show potential for such reversal, viz., by using the digital platform as a decentered methodology giving voice to 'digital natives' and by creating a space for partnering virtuality with face-to-face, family-based interactions.



Speakers
avatar for Lope Lesigues

Lope Lesigues

Adjunct Professor, Fordham University


Saturday November 7, 2015 11:00am - 12:15pm
Marietta (Conference Center)

12:30pm

Community Lunch
If you have registered for conference meals, you will receive a ticket for the community lunch when you arrive at the meeting.

Saturday November 7, 2015 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Heritage B (Conference Center)

1:00pm

Senior Think Tank Working Group
At the request of Bob O'Gorman we have made special arrangements for the Senior Think Tank Working Group. The group will sit together at a designated table at the Community Lunch on Saturday and then move to a separate meeting room from 1:00-2:10 PM. Select this session if you wish to meet with the Senior Think Tank Working Group, but don't forget to also join them during the Community Lunch.

Saturday November 7, 2015 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Oglethorpe (Conference Center)

1:30pm

P 1
Imagining the Possibilities
Erik Renkema (Protestant Theological University)

Poster Session. [Notes] A significant feature of many schools in the Netherlands is the religious diversity of the student population. This feature of diversity is very explicit at schools that are the result of a merger of a public and a non-government school, the cooperation school. At these schools there is no affiliation with one specific religious tradition and these schools don't present themselves as public schools. This PhD-research concentrates on the moment of contemplation in religious education at one specific school: how isdiversity dealt with in this practice and how do teachers motivate their choices?



Speakers
avatar for Erik Renkema

Erik Renkema

Assistant Professor Worldview Education and Diversity, Windesheim University of Applied Science
Dr. Erik Renkema (1972) (www.erikrenkema.nl) is Associate Professor in Worldview Education and Diversity in the Theology & Worldview research group of Windesheim University of Applied Sciences in Zwolle. He is the coordinator of the Working Place for Worldview Education and Diversity... Read More →


Saturday November 7, 2015 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Foyer (Conference Center)

1:30pm

P 2
Interreligious Education: A Complementary Notion of Christianity and Confucianism
Imelda Lam (Catholic Diocese of Hong Kong)

Poster Session. [Notes] With the migration of various ethnicities, the postmodern world is breaking down the barriers between different traditions, cultures, and interreligious communities. People are becoming more aware that neglecting other faiths can bring misunderstandings, hostility, war and destruction. To maintain peace and harmony, people acknowledge that initiating dialogue between different faiths can be the best way to prevent confrontation. Interreligious education therefore fosters a quest for a wider understanding of others, and promotes communication for building good human and global relations.



Speakers
avatar for Imelda Lam

Imelda Lam

Curriculum Officer/Adjunct Teacher, Fordham University


Saturday November 7, 2015 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Foyer (Conference Center)

1:30pm

P 3
A Third Mode of Human Experiencing? Imagination from a Psychological Perspective
Emanuel Magro (The Catholic University of America)

Poster Session. [Notes] Approaching imagination from the perspective of Paul W. Pruyser’s work on “illusionistic world” and “illusionistic processing,” assessed in light of D. W. Winnicott’s notions of “potential space” and “transitional objects and phenomena,” reveals imagination as an intermediary area and as a third mode of human experiencing. Imagination is a means of creating continuity, of transformation and in some cases of disruption and as such plays a distinct role in religious education. The processes operative in imagination disclose the significant and fragile nature of religious symbols and images.



Speakers
EM

Emanuel Magro

Assistant Professor, The Catholic University of America


Saturday November 7, 2015 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Foyer (Conference Center)

1:30pm

P4

Imagination Becomes Reality:  Women Religious Leaders in Higher Education
Barbara Morgan (Brigham Young University)

Poster Session.  Who would have imagined the change in higher education chaplains over the last century? In contrast to the white male paid chaplaincy positions of the early to mid 20th century, colleges and universities are experiencing an unheard of increase in women chaplains. This poster will look at the evolving positions of chaplains at both Harvard and MIT over the last half-century, focusing specifically on women serving as chaplains from a variety of faith constituencies.  It will portray various roles and experiences some of these female chaplains have experienced by sharing first hand stories and scenarios. It will also demonstrate the rising need of female religious leaders and mentors in higher education and the stumbling blocks and stepping-stones to get there.

 


Speakers
avatar for Barbara Morgan Gardner

Barbara Morgan Gardner

Assistant Professor, Brigham Young University


Saturday November 7, 2015 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Foyer (Conference Center)

2:15pm

C 3.07
Re-Imagining Youth Confirmation
Lisa Kimball (Virginia Theological Seminary)
Terri L. Elton (Luther Seminary)

Colloquium. [Notes] What is the meaning and purpose of confirmation as church affiliation in North America declines? What does confirmation offer to meet the spiritual hunger of contemporary teenagers? What can be learned from vibrant programs to help young people grow in their faith? The Confirmation Project, funded by the Lilly Endowment, studied confirmation and equivalent practices in five denominations that practice infant baptism. With findings from this national study, we will reimagine confirmation as a vital, transformative process, noting the role of mentoring, youth agency, and congregational climate.


Betwixt and Between: Imagining the Gifts of Middle School Christian Education
Mary Carter-Waren (St. Thomas University)
Bryan Allen Demeritte (St. Thomas University)

Colloquium. [Notes] Religious education for middle school learners, betwixt and between early childhood and adolescence, has become a concern for religious educators and congregations. Many young people find it something to endure so they can “graduate” (sometimes permanently) from religious education and, often, from the church itself. How might we re-imagine this? This colloquy will suggest re-imaging middle school religious education using the insights of gifted middle school education as expressed by the Parallel Curriculum Model. Practical insights for teacher training/curricular planning will be offered.



Speakers
MC

Mary Carter-Waren

Faculty, St. Thomas University
BD

Bryan Demeritte

Adjunct Professor, Saint Thomas University
TM

Terri Martinson Elton

Associate Professor of Leadership, Luther Seminary
avatar for Lisa Kimball

Lisa Kimball

Professor, Virginia Theological Seminary
My teaching and research focus on equipping church leaders to nurture faith lifelong and life-wide, paying particular attention to daily practices that reveal the mystery of God, build resilience, and form just communities.


Saturday November 7, 2015 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Dahlonega (Conference Center)

2:15pm

C 3.08
Seeing is Being: A Pauline Perspective for Adolescent Girls
Emily Peck-McClain (Eastern Mennonite Seminary)

Colloquium. [Notes] According to the apostle Paul, being in Christ means having a new perspective, one that enables living as part of the new creation now. Paul intended and trusted that his letters would help enable and sustain this new perspective in early Christian communities. His perspective is helpful especially for adolescent girls. The question I am exploring is how Paul's letters can do for girls now what they did then: shift perspective, sustain new ways of seeing, and inspire new living. Seeing differently requires engaging the imagination. What pedagogical tools can help this creative process?


Role Models: A Bridge for Religious Imagining
Reem Javed (Graduate Theological Union)

Colloquium. [Notes] Through the critical pedagogical concept of hidden curriculum, this colloquy will explore the potential of role model education in helping Muslim female students imagine a future of possibilities as Muslim women. This exploration will be in the context of Islamic school development in North America. Islamic education through such schools has primarily been a means of preserving the identity of this religious minority through connection to an “Old World” past, placed in conversation with resistance and racism this group experiences in North America. Through such education, importance has been placed on the outward piety and purity of Muslim women at the expense of their autonomous roles as believers. Through the bridge of role models, the goal is to shift this focus and afford students opportunities to imagine a different future.



Speakers
RJ

Reem Javed

Student, Graduate Theological Union
avatar for Emily Peck-McClain

Emily Peck-McClain

Assistant Professor of Christian Formation, Preaching, and Worship, Eastern Mennonite Seminary


Saturday November 7, 2015 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Suwannee (Conference Center)

2:15pm

C 3.09
Re-Imagining Christian Education Through the Voices of Children
Virginia Lee (Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary)
Reginald Blount (Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary)

Colloquium. [Notes] Christian education needs to be profoundly transformed. In this colloquy, we will help participants radically change their understanding of Christian education rooted in actual practices of child advocacy.


The Saving Power of Education: How Our Soteriology Might Help Us Reimagine the Tasks of Education
Hannah Adams Ingram (Iliff School of Theology)

Colloquium. [Notes] My project suggests that US discourse about education posits a salvific function, specifically the ability to “save” marginalized groups from poverty by lifting them into middle-class success. I will share excerpts from my discourse analysis of public statements in which I investigated how uplift language was deployed. The current discourse around education supports a view of salvation as personal and individual, disconnected from community justice, and the move liberation theology took in asserting that salvation concerned more than the individual could transform the way we view education.

Speakers
avatar for Reggie Blount

Reggie Blount

Assistant Professor of Formation, Youth and Culture, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary
HI

Hannah Ingram

PhD Student, Iliff School of Theology/University of Denver
avatar for Virginia Lee

Virginia Lee

Associate Professor of Christian Education, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary


Saturday November 7, 2015 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Chastain A (Hotel Terrace Level)

2:15pm

RC 3.05
Re-Imagining Morality on the Web
Tracey Lamont (Fordham University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Recent sociological studies suggest that many young people today lack a sense of socio-moralcommitment and responsibility. Drawing insight from C. Wright Mills’ The Sociological Imagination (1959), this research study asks: How do Catholic young adult websites contributeto the creation and performance of a storied identity that encourages the development of asociological imagination, towards a sense of shared moral responsibility among young adults inan increasingly pluralistic age? This study explores at how religious organizations are using newmedia to communicate moral content to young adults and critiques the websites’ conceptions ofyoung adult development and morality in light of Kegan’s (1982, 1994) constructivedevelopmentaltheory. Guided by Kegan’s theory, the study explores how the websites functionas a holding environment for young adult moral development by exploring how they provideconfirmation, challenge, and continuity.


Creative Communication: The Potential for Digital Creativity in Theological Education

Daniella Zsupan-Jerome (Loyola University New Orleans)

Colloquium. [Note] This paper considers digital creativity as artistic expression, and proposes its use for theological education in a ministerial formation setting. Creativity as an aspect of theological education honors the imago Dei within the learner, and the innate creative spark of the person that reveals his/her Creator. In a practical and pedagogical sense, creative work demonstrates appropriation: both understanding the content and the ability to re-propose it anew. After establishing these theological and pedagogical merits, the presentation offers concrete examples from graduate ministry students.


Speakers
avatar for Tracey Lamont

Tracey Lamont

Assistant Professor, Loyola University, New Orleans
Assistant Professor of Religious Education at Loyola University, New Orleans, Loyola Institute for Ministry.
DZ

Daniella Zsupan-Jerome

Assistant Professor, Loyola Univeristy New Orleans


Saturday November 7, 2015 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Ponce de Leon (Hotel Terrace Level)

2:15pm

RC 3.06
Re-Imagining Ecological Models for Religious Education
Sally Johnston (Yale Divinity School)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Sallie McFague’s metaphorical theology challenges religious educators to live into the question: How can we re-imagine ecological models for religious education? In this paper I will explore a range of responses, comparing the educational implications of the theological work of Sallie McFague and Norman Wirzba, and considering Sharon Parks’ metaphorical and ecological re-imagining of James Fowler’s faith development theory. I will conclude by proposing “Sabbath friendship” as a healing metaphor for re-imagining an ecological model for religious education.


The Role of Religious Imagination for the Transformation of Consciousness Regarding the Ecological Crisis of Our Time
Miriam Martin (Saint Paul University)

Colloquium. [Notes] Mary Elizabeth Moore links the critical role imagination plays in religious education and in the formation of our self-understanding, our identity (Moore, 2005). Thus, if imagination is a constitutive dimension of faith and an abiding and necessary enticement to believe, hope, and love (Cote, 2003), what can imagination offer to the work of the transformation of consciousness required for a faith-filled response to the ecological crises of our time? This study explores the role of imagination in the religious education of leaders facing the ecological crisis today.


Speakers
avatar for Sally Johnston

Sally Johnston

Educational Ministry. Adjunct Professor., Union Presbyterian Seminary
I am interested in encouraging dialogue about ecological models of religious education and spiritual models of ecological education.
MM

Miriam Martin

Professor, Saint Paul University


Saturday November 7, 2015 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Chastain B (Hotel Terrace Level)

2:15pm

R 3.01
The Mimetic-Poetic Imagination: How Recent Neuroscientific and Cognitive Psychological Research Suggests a Narratival-Developmental Approach to Identity
Joshua Lunde-Whitler (Boston College)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] This essay will explore imagination in light of select current works in neurological/psychological research that have yet to be adequately examined by religious educators. Their approaches to the brain and consciousness, all of which are centrally guided by the role of narrative, together offer a non-reductionist, dynamic, and lifelong perspective on identity and development, deemed here as "narratival-developmental." Imagination, in this view, is a function of the so-called "mimetic-poetic" process that defines the consciousness and drives identity development throughout the lifespan.


Imagining Complex Adaptive Religions: Science as Disruptive/Transformative Raconteur
Eileen Daily (Boston University School of Theology)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Examples abound of the arts and humanities sparking religious imagination. Recent media-fueled friction between science and religion, however, means fewer cases jump to mind of science inspiring religious imagination. One aspect of contemporary science is offered here as a lens through which to see religions or religious education afresh. An overview of complex adaptive systems is followed by an argument for seeing religions as such. Three examples of specific aspects of the new science that offer wisdom for optimizing adaptability of religious education to a changing environment will follow.



Speakers
avatar for Eileen Daily

Eileen Daily

Director, Doctor of Ministry in Transformational Leadership, Boston University
Visual art and RE; Religions as complex adaptive systems; public RE; informal RE; transformative theological education
avatar for Joshua Lunde-Whitler

Joshua Lunde-Whitler

My areas of interest include narrative identity, lifelong religious formation that promotes justice, and the present-future of theological education. In 2018 I received a PhD in Theology and Education from Boston College, and my dissertation focused on narrative identity and development... Read More →


Saturday November 7, 2015 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Augusta (Conference Center)

2:15pm

R 3.02
Making Good of What Is Hidden in Plain Sight: Sebald's Austerlitz
Ted Newell (Crandall University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] W. G. Sebald's approach to the Holocaust in his novel Austerlitz opens up the unspeakable. In his protagonist, Sebald encapsulates the history of twentieth-century Europe that cannot be grasped straight on. Austerlitz finds himself on a picaresque journey toward truth. A hallmark of Jesus is to challenge denials of reality. In the prophets, “imaginations of their hearts” describes persons out of touch with the God who will ultimately insist on reality. Two poles anchor a pedagogy of seeing whole – resistance, and beauty. Beauty answers the question: if the gospel is true, what will its world look like? Imagination is creativity in visual arts or music, but is also becoming willing to act upon that which we occlude. Examples of transformative Christian social imagination are many. Religious education has an outstanding vocation of hope.


Sacred Encounters: Fostering the Religious Imagination through Literature
Dennis Gunn (Iona College)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Literature can be a powerful lens through which we can encounter the sacred, inviting us to experience mystery, opening our awareness to deeper meaning in the midst of the ordinary, and beckoning us to a sense of greater inter-connectedness with the world we live in. In a word, literature can speak the language of the religious imagination. Using examples from the works of Flannery O'Connor, Alice Walker, and TS Eliot, this study will explore the potential of literature for fostering the religious imagination in the context of teaching religion.



Speakers
DG

Dennis Gunn

Instructor, Iona College
avatar for Ted Newell

Ted Newell

Professor of education, Crandall University


Saturday November 7, 2015 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Marietta (Conference Center)

2:15pm

R 3.03
Interreligious Dialogue at a Momentous Anniversary: Religious Educators Re-Imagining Nostra Aetate in Connecting, Disrupting, and Transforming Ways
Carl Procario-Foley (Iona College)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] The fiftieth anniversary of Nostra Aetate challenges religious educators to examine the signs of the times and to imagine how this document is best taught in the face of interreligious bigotry, violence, ignorance, and indifference. Examining the postmodern landscape, this paper discusses ways to connect with the seminal points of this historic document while exploring new trajectories especially relevant for today.


Pluralizing Catholic Identit(y/ies)
Graham McDonough (University of Victoria)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] In an age where secularism and lack of religious commitment are perceived to be eroding Catholic school distinctiveness, Cook (2001) proposes that Catholic educational leaders become “architects of Catholic culture,” and Rymarz (2013) perceives several challenges to the permeation of Catholic identity in Catholic schools. Interestingly, neither author explores what Catholic culture or identity mean, and refer to them in singular terms. I contend that proposals concerning Catholic culture and identity are limited unless they acknowledge a plurality of Catholic identities.



Speakers
GM

Graham McDonough

Associate Professor, University of Victoria
CP

Carl Procario-Foley

Director Mission and Ministry, Iona College
mission education academic service-learning international service-learning interreligious partnerships


Saturday November 7, 2015 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Brookhaven (Hotel Terrace Level)

2:15pm

R 3.04
Dis/Abling Church: Imagination, Intellectual Disability, and the Baptist Distinctive of the Priesthood of All
B. Scott Stephens (Logsdon Seminary)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] The last century saw the birth of theologies which moved away from the center. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, while it did not halt discrimination within churches, brought the experiences of the disabled into public view. In relation to this, many in our churches who are intellectually disabled continue to find themselves marginalized. One possible way forward, within the context of Baptist churches, lies in imaginatively engaging with the Baptist distinctive of the priesthood of all believers as a catalyst for religious educators to begin the process of “dis/abling” church.


Inside the Mirror: Five Domains of Theopoetic Critique on Theological Education
Patrick Reyes (Northeastern University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Beginning with an overview of the emerging literature on theopoetics, this paper considers the implications of a theopoetic critique across five domains of theological education: reading, writing, research methods, pedagogy, and publication. It argues that the theopoetic impulse to value embodiment and aesthetics asks more of current religious education practices than they currently provide. Suggestions are made for areas of growth that support a theological imaginary that is more fully incarnational and prophetic.



Speakers
avatar for Dr. Patrick B. Reyes

Dr. Patrick B. Reyes

Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs and Director of the Center for Community Engagement, Trinity Lutheran College
Dr. Patrick B. Reyes is a Salinas, California raised Latin@ practical theologian, activist, writer, and popular educator. He currently serves as the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs and the Director of the Center of Community Engagement at Trinity Lutheran College in Washington... Read More →
avatar for Benjamin Stephens

Benjamin Stephens

Student, Logsdon Seminary


Saturday November 7, 2015 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Savannah (Conference Center)

3:45pm

3:45pm

Catholic Community of Practice
"A Catechetical Congress: An Idea whose Time has Come - Again?"

Speakers
TG

Thomas Groome

Director, Boston College


Saturday November 7, 2015 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Suwannee (Conference Center)

3:45pm

Lutheran Community of Practice
TBA

Saturday November 7, 2015 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Augusta (Conference Center)

3:45pm

Methodist Community of Practice
TBA

Saturday November 7, 2015 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Oglethorpe (Conference Center)

3:45pm

Other Communities of Practice
TBA

Saturday November 7, 2015 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Dahlonega (Conference Center)

3:45pm

3:45pm

5:00pm

Plenary 4: Nurturing Care for God’s Creation: An Opportunity to Expand the Religious Educational Imagination
Conversation with Kyle Kramer, Jennifer Ayres, Timothy L. Van Meter, and a Fourth conversation partner, moderated by Miriam Martin. 

Moderators & Responders
MM

Miriam Martin

Professor, Saint Paul University

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Ayres

Jennifer Ayres

Associate Professor, Candler School of Theology, Emory University
KK

Kyle Kramer

Passionist Earth and Spirit Center (Louisville, KY)
TL

Timothy L. Van Meter

Methodist Theological Seminary of Ohio


Saturday November 7, 2015 5:00pm - 6:30pm
Buckhead B (Conference Center)

6:30pm

Evening Free for Dinner Locally
There will be sign-up sheets available for dinner options.

Saturday November 7, 2015 6:30pm - 9:30pm
TBA
 
Sunday, November 8
 

7:00am

Labyrinth Walk
Sunday November 8, 2015 7:00am - 8:00am
Oglethorpe (Conference Center)

7:00am

Roman Catholic Liturgy
Sunday November 8, 2015 7:00am - 8:00am
Marietta (Conference Center)

7:00am

Yoga
Sunday November 8, 2015 7:00am - 8:00am
Heritage A (Conference Center)

8:00am

8:30am

Exhibits and Bookstore
Helpers
avatar for Lucinda Huffaker

Lucinda Huffaker

Yale Divinity School

Sunday November 8, 2015 8:30am - 11:45am
Foyer (Conference Center)

8:45am

C 4.06
Multiple Self: The Relational Body and Imagination
Karin Craven (Luther Seminary)

Colloquium. [Notes] Personhood understood as the multiple self roots the conversation about imagination fully in the sensate, relational body. The multiple self understood from different vantage points -- through learning and postcolonial theories, psychoanalytic and trauma theories, feminist and womanist theologies, and interpersonal neurobiology -- grounds the understanding of the play of imagination, inter-psychically and inter-relationally, and therefore creates a learning and living environment capable of exploring and negotiating differences of race, gender and class.


An Imaginative Journeying into Self and Others: A Worldview Approach
John Valk (University of New Brunswick)
Aybiçe Tosun (Ankara University)

Colloquium. [Paper] Exploring one’s own beliefs, values and behaviours (one’s own worldview) necessitates a journey into one’s “inner territory” – into one’s heart, soul and mind. It propels one’s imagination for it is an attempt to Know Oneself. But it cannot be done in isolation. It necessitates Knowing Others – a journey into the “inner territory” of others, imperative in our world of today. This presentation presents a worldview course model for imaginatively and experientially exploring Self and Others. It will also demonstrate through research the effectiveness of such an approach.



Speakers
KC

Karin Craven

Doctoral Student, Luther Seminary
avatar for Aybiçe Tosun

Aybiçe Tosun

Research Assistant, Eskisahir Osmangazi University
JV

John Valk

Professor, University of New Brunswick


Sunday November 8, 2015 8:45am - 10:00am
Chastain A (Hotel Terrace Level)

8:45am

C 4.07
Social Media Engagement, Participatory Pedagogy, and Christian Religious Education
Angela Gorrell (Fuller Theological Seminary)

Colloquium. [Paper] This session will report initial findings from a national survey based on 775 congregants living in 37 states, from over 25 denominations and two case studies of US churches (Spring 2015). In this session we will discuss how Christians and churches in the United States are currently using social media, perceptions of these practices, opinions about how social media should be used, as well as implications of this research for Christian formation and education in churches and seminaries. 


Creativity Pedagogy in Higher Education
Johanna Selles (Emmanuel College, University of Toronto)

Colloquium.
 [Notes] Imagination and creativity resulting in innovation is generally considered a desirable outcome of higher education. As teachers, we hope that creative pedagogy results in awakened imagination. But does creativity reside in the pedagogy, the program, the learning community, or the institution? This colloquy will explore the capacities associated with creativity and the implications for learning and teaching in the knowledge age.


Speakers
avatar for Angela Williams Gorrell

Angela Williams Gorrell

Adjunct faculty and researcher, Fuller Theological Seminary
I am a passionate teacher, preacher, and researcher. I study, write about, and teach in the areas of practical theology, participatory culture, contemporary ecclesiology, leadership, and Christian education and formation. My dissertation research involves the interplay of current... Read More →
avatar for Johanna Selles

Johanna Selles

Associate Professor, Emmanuel College, University of Toronto
As far as creative practice, I am interested in photography and creative writing. My presentation continues to explore experiences at Toronto's Centre for Social Innovation and a course I teach on Creativity and Spirituality. How can processes such as designing for empathy and design... Read More →


Sunday November 8, 2015 8:45am - 10:00am
Augusta (Conference Center)

8:45am

C 4.08
A Multiple Case Study Investigation into the Instructional Methodologies Utilized by Catholic School Religion Teachers to Implement the “Doctrinal Elements of Curriculum Framework for the Development of Catechetical Materials for Young People of High School Age”
Lindsay Radice (The Catholic University of America)

Colloquium. [Notes] This multiple case study investigation provides a rich description of the instructional methodologies Catholic high school religion teachers use to implement the Doctrinal Elements of Curriculum Framework for the Development of Catechetical Materials for Young People of High School Age. Findings presented will explore how religion teacher participants have used their own experiences and individual talents to make the contents of the framework accessible to high school students, and what opportunities institutions of higher education may develop to further support the future of Catholic school religion teachers.


Stimulating Imagination. The Didactical Roles of Pollefeyt Revisited
André Mulder (Windesheim University of Applied Sciences)

Colloquium. [Notes] This paper challenges the hermeneutical stance of Pollefeyt (2004) with regard to religious education from the perspective of imagination. We state that the very nature of religious sources asks for attention to the process of imagination in order to grow in competence of reorienting one’s outlook on life encountering religious traditions. In addition to Pollefeyt’s three didactical roles - witness, specialist, and moderator - we construe a fourth role, that of the imaginator, which fills the void we discover when Pollefeyt puts his hermeneutical theory into practice.



Speakers
avatar for André Mulder

André Mulder

Professor of Theology and Worldview, Windesheim University of Applied Sciences Zwolle
avatar for Lindsay Radice

Lindsay Radice

Teaching Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate, Catholic University of America
I am a Ph.D. Candidate and teaching fellow at the Catholic University of America. My interests are Catholic religious education, Catholic schools, religion teachers, and curriculum development. I am in the final stages of completing my dissertation, and am exited to present my... Read More →


Sunday November 8, 2015 8:45am - 10:00am
Suwannee (Conference Center)

8:45am

R 4.01
The Power of Imagination, Dreams of Founders and Principals of the First Islamic Schools for Primary Education in the Netherlands.
Bahaeddin Budak (Inholland University of Applied Sciences)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] We present on the ‘imagination’ of the founders and principals of Islamic primary schools in the Netherlands. Key persons of the first two Islamic schools and today’s board members and principals were interviewed about their ideals and dreams and present days’ school identity, respectively. The first founders and principals dreamed about a school teaching and learning into Islam: priority should be given to Quran Recitation. This dream however could not be concretized. We present the process from ‘imagination’ tothe 'reality' of a Dutch school based on the Islamic tradition.


Imagine Global Citizenship for Worldview Education
Siebren Miedema (VU University, Amsterdam)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] We have given attention to the relationship of citizenship education and worldview education combined with human rights education. We realize, however, that we have conceptualized that concept mostly in national or regional terms. So, a kind of particularistic conception of the concept ‘citizenship' was presupposed in our work combined with a strong plea for a particular kind of contextuality. Taking into account several developments on a global scale we will imagine the necessity of global citizenship for worldview education.

Speakers
avatar for Bahaddin Budak

Bahaddin Budak

Teacher trainer and PHD student, Inholland
Teacher Trainer Islamic Religious Education Phd research: Identity of Islamic Primary School in the Netherlands
SM

Siebren Miedema

Prof.em., VU University Amsterdam, the Netherlands


Sunday November 8, 2015 8:45am - 10:00am
Savannah (Conference Center)

8:45am

R 4.02
Adult Religious Education with Trauma in View: Imagining in Fractures
Callid Keefe-Perry (Boston University School of Theology)

Research Interest Group. [paper] This paper claims that the experience of trauma is both woefully unacknowledged and that, wherever it is present, its influence is profound. Consequently, it asks how adult religious educators can best proceed given the realities of trauma and its effects. How can we facilitate deepening a person's relationship with God and others when trauma has damaged a person's capacity to relate? Suggestions are made for future work by integrating trauma analysis from Judith Herman and Bessel van der Kolk with theological insights from Mary Elizabeth Moore and Rebecca Chopp.


The Sacraments Reappropriated: Imagination Embodied
Robert O'Gorman (Loyola University Chicago, emeritus)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Focusing of our theme, The Power of Imagining (“the life giving possibilities of education in faith”), this paper reexamines our sacramental religious education. Paul Tillich has cautioned us: “The relationship of man to the ultimate undergoes changes. Contents of ultimate concern vanish or are replaced by others… Symbols which for a certain period, or in a certain place, expressed the truth of faith for a certain group now only remind of the faith of the past. They have lost their truths…” Our present understanding of the cosmos and the human has radically challenged our religious education.



Speakers
avatar for Callid Keefe-Perry

Callid Keefe-Perry

Executive Director at ARC | Doctoral Candidate at BU, ARC: Arts | Religion | Culture & Boston University School of Theology
Callid Keefe-Perry is a father and husband. He is a member of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) and travels in the itinerant Ministry, serving within and beyond that denomination. He is an organizational consultant, retreat leader, and teacher of discernment influenced by... Read More →
RO

Robert O'Gorman

Retired Professor, Loyola University Chicago


Sunday November 8, 2015 8:45am - 10:00am
Brookhaven (Hotel Terrace Level)

8:45am

R 4.03
The Oppressed Emotion and Imagination (Reading the Bible with Body-Centered Movement)
Hye Hyun Han (Boston University School of Theology)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] People of the postmodern world are more familiar with emotional approaches to experiencing God rather than objectively reading the Bible. In this respect, I plan to try a different approach from traditional ways of reading the Bible, namely through body-centered movement based on imagination. In this research, I will focus on the case of oppressed emotions in Korean women. I will discuss the effectiveness of imagination with a body-centered approach to the Bible through a spiritual and psychological method to analyze the process of reaching toward God-consciousness through imagination.

Aesthetic Empathy and Imagination: The Pedagogy of Friedl Dicker-Brandeis with Applications for Religious Educators
Barbara Javore (Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary)

Research Interest Group.
 [Paper] Building upon the concept of aesthetic empathy, Friedl Dicker-Brandeis devised an art pedagogy that would become the basis for the practice of art therapy. The art courses she conducted for children in the Terezín ghetto during the Holocaust, were meant to free the child’s imagination, nurture creative agency and restore a sense of reality in the midst of chaos and deprivation. Using her pedagogical methods, a workshop will be designed to develop aesthetic experiences that will stimulate the imagination and nurture creative responses for at risk youth in a religious context.



Speakers
avatar for Hye Hyun Han

Hye Hyun Han

Student (STM program), Boston University
BJ

Barbara Javore

Minister, Adjunct Professor, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary
Aesthetic Empathy and Sacred Imagining are intrinsic to the work I am developing.


Sunday November 8, 2015 8:45am - 10:00am
Dahlonega (Conference Center)

8:45am

R 4.04
Imagining Just Peace: Deciding to Hope
Mary Elizabeth Moore (Boston University School of Theology)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] This paper analyzes oral histories with just peacemakers to identify ways they engage imagination as a source for hope and a guide for transformative action. The paper describes imagination as a decision to hope, distinguishing hope from optimism, and it analyzes the role of imagination as revealed in the literature of just peacebuilding and in narratives of just peace-builders. The heart of the paper is a thematic analysis of nine oral history interviews (Jewish, Christian, and Muslim) in dialogue with the literature. The paper concludes with a theoretical proposition regarding imagination as a decision to hope and with educational proposals for schools, activists, and religious leaders.


Jesus: Pedagogue of Prophetic Imagination
Christopher Welch (Boston College)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] If education in faith includes a tutoring of the imagination, then Christian religious education must attend not only to the prophetic content of Jesus' own imagination, but also to the ways in which he kindled such imagination in others. The prophetic task entails both a critique of the dominant "false" consciousness and and animation of a community with an alternative consciousness. In particular, a Christology that centers on Jesus' empowering of his disciples in imagining and practicing the Reign of God prompts us to retrieve from Jesus principles for teaching for a prophetic imagination.



Speakers
avatar for Mary Elizabeth Moore

Mary Elizabeth Moore

Professor, Boston University
CW

Christopher Welch

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, Rivier University


Sunday November 8, 2015 8:45am - 10:00am
Chastain B (Hotel Terrace Level)

8:45am

R 4.05
Alternating Currents: Sacramental and Prophetic Imagining and Church Education
Kieran Scott (Fordham University)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] This paper advocates that education ought to be movement toward a unity of conflicting forces in the life of the congregation/parish. This paradox is captured best in the two divergent forms of imagination, namely, the sacramental and prophetic, both of which are grounded and united in their commitment to seeing ultimate reality. Church education in and for sacramental and prophetic practices offers the possibility of revitalizing church life from within and, in turn, offers an outward response to repair our social and public world.


Participating in God’s Imagination: Classical Pragmatism, Trinitarian Theology, and Religious Education
John Falcone (Boston College)

Research Interest Group. [Paper] Trinitarian theology in the mold of Classical Pragmatism and Peircean semiotics can provide a theological grounding for the imaginative pedagogy that Maria Harris championed. Classical Pragmatist theologians speak the language of modern North Americans; they describe Trinitarian theology in terms of experience, and they link imagination with the work of God’s Holy Spirit. A pedagogy rooted in this theology draws attention to classroom values of healthy development, spontaneity, structured play, and rigorous reflection.



Speakers
avatar for John Falcone

John Falcone

Consultant, Catholics for AIDS Prevention and Support,
Critical pedagogy, Bible, youth ministry.
avatar for Kieran Scott

Kieran Scott

Professor, Fordham University


Sunday November 8, 2015 8:45am - 10:00am
Ponce de Leon (Hotel Terrace Level)

8:45am

W 4.09
Mining the Gap: Neuroscience and Emotional Memory as Tools for Imagining the Journey from Information to Meaning
Jason Whitehead (Iliff School of Theology)
Holly J. Inglis (Wellshire Presbyterian Church)

Workshop. [Notes] Pastoral theologian Carrie Doehring (2010), when speaking about method in relationship to neuroscience and theology, cautioned theologians to “mind the gap” (p. 93) as we draw conclusions or ideas from scientific research. In this workshop, we will seek to “mine the gap” between information and meaning, and neuroscience and theology by engaging in a praxis-oriented educational workshop. Key to this approach is understanding the genesis of imagination and how it might be practically used to open preconceived beliefs to novel possibilities in both higher education and communities of faith.



Speakers
HI

Holly Inglis

Associate Pastor, Palms Presbyterian Church
avatar for Jason Whitehead

Jason Whitehead

Director of Consultation & Formation, Iliff School of Theology
Pastoral Theologian Process Theology Neuroscience Narrative therapy


Sunday November 8, 2015 8:45am - 10:00am
Marietta (Conference Center)

10:15am

AANARE Working Group
The Asians and Asian North America Religious Educator (AANARE) Work Group welcomes everybody who is interested in the exploration, development, and enhancement of Asian/Asian North American perspectives in religious education.  As a Working Group of the REA/APRRE, we gather to provide one another collegial support and to stimulate thinking and discussion for the generation of new scholarship and resources. One of our first projects is this bibliography of religious education scholarship published by Asian and Asian North American religious educators.

Sunday November 8, 2015 10:15am - 11:30am
Chastain B (Hotel Terrace Level)

10:15am

Black Experience Working Group
After time for introductions and checking-in, work group members will discuss the following questions: What do we as Pan African Scholars in religious education have to say regarding the 2015 annual meeting theme of imagination? 

Speakers
LG

Leah Gunning Francis

Professor, Eden Theological Seminary


Sunday November 8, 2015 10:15am - 11:30am
Dahlonega (Conference Center)

10:15am

History Working Group
The History Work Group will begin to brainstorm potential projects for the next three Annual Meetings. These might include paper presentations, film showings, or the history of art in relation to religious education. New voices and ideas are welcome.

Sunday November 8, 2015 10:15am - 11:30am
Savannah (Conference Center)

10:15am

Peace and Justice Working Group
This work group will discuss the role imagination plays in promoting religious education for peace and justice.  Participants will be encouraged to share their own writing and projects focused on this topic while also drawing from seminal insights of the conference presentations.

Speakers
CP

Carl Procario-Foley

Director Mission and Ministry, Iona College
mission education academic service-learning international service-learning interreligious partnerships


Sunday November 8, 2015 10:15am - 11:30am
Suwannee (Conference Center)

10:15am

Religious Persecution, Vicarious Trauma Working Group
In keeping with this year's examination of imagination, the Religious Persecution, the Vicarious Trauma work group will examine a number of artistic responses to suffering in the wake of persecution. Using examples from Middle Eastern Christian and Eastern European Jewish communities, we'll explore how visual imagery and material space can be used pedagogically, rather than as a means of separation and segregation, as tools to educate towards common imaginative and healing responses to suffering. This will be an interactive session where we will present images as a means for stimulating conversation about the subject.

Speakers
JM

Jennifer Mosher

Doctoral Student, Union Theological Seminary, NYC
avatar for Sarah Tauber

Sarah Tauber

Professor, Jewish Theological Seminary
Professor Sarah Tauber is an assistant professor of Jewish Education at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America and a rabbinic candidate in the Jewish Renewal network's rabbinic program (Aleph). Sarah's trajectory as a teacher, writer, scholar and activist in the world of education... Read More →


Sunday November 8, 2015 10:15am - 11:30am
Augusta (Conference Center)

10:15am

Schools Working Group
The schools work group will continue to explore how teacher worldview and autobiography influence classroom pedagogy and scholastic research. The work group is interested in gathering written reflections from professors and practitioners on their own unique experiences as youth and young adults in RE and how these experiences have contributed to their current pedagogical practices. Did you have a particularly good or bad experience with RE as a young person? How has reflection upon your own RE experience influenced how you teach and research RE? If you are interested in these questions the schools work group would love to have your input and collaboration at the meeting in Atlanta.

Speakers
MG

Matthew Geiger

High School Teacher, St. Stephen's and St. Agnes School


Sunday November 8, 2015 10:15am - 11:30am
Brookhaven (Hotel Terrace Level)

10:15am

Science and Technology Working Group
The group will gather primarily to network and ponder the meeting's theme in light of this working group. Dean is also bringing along a paper on neuroscientists as metaphysicians, in case there is interest in discussing it.

Speakers
avatar for Dean Blevins

Dean Blevins

Professor of Christian Formation and Discipleship, Nazarene Theological Seminary
The Reverend Dean G. Blevins, Ph.D. currently serves as Professor of Christian Formation and Discipleship at Nazarene Theological Seminary. An active scholar, Dean has contributed to several books and published over 60 church related or scholarly articles. In addition, Dean co-wrote... Read More →


Sunday November 8, 2015 10:15am - 11:30am
Marietta (Conference Center)

10:15am

Senior Think Tank Working Group
Speakers
RO

Robert O'Gorman

Retired Professor, Loyola University Chicago


Sunday November 8, 2015 10:15am - 11:30am
Chastain A (Hotel Terrace Level)

11:45am

Plenary 5: The Imagery of Religious Education: Continuing the Conversation
Speakers
avatar for Harold (Bud) Horell

Harold (Bud) Horell

Assistant Professor of Religious Education, Fordham University


Sunday November 8, 2015 11:45am - 12:45pm
Buckhead B (Conference Center)

12:45pm

REA:APPRRE Business Meeting
All are welcome! Please help us make the decisions that make REA strong. Make sure you read the nominations and other reports prior to the business meeting, so that you know what you will need to vote upon.

Sunday November 8, 2015 12:45pm - 1:30pm
Buckhead B (Conference Center)

1:30pm

Please Fill Out a Conference Evaluation Form!
Please be sure to fill out an overall conference evaluation. If you missed the chance to fill out evaluations for other sessions, just go to them in the schedule and click their feedback buttons or use this generic evaluation form and select the proper session.

Sunday November 8, 2015 1:30pm - 3:00pm
TBA